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Scheherezade presents -- a Domestic Science Fiction production:

Out of the darkness // of the past
there is a legend // (oh yess!)

(from "TITANS" @ PPM,BBWolf 1975)

This page is dedicated to the old British rock/metal band, B B Wolf.

Formed in the late 1970s, 'Wolf eschewed commercial success big-time. Rather, their Manifesto cited unmitigated heavyness, alarming pomposity, and Jungian self-referential 'Jazz-metal'.

The original band members, John Wyant, Paul Martin, Willem Mecklenburg and Paddy O'Reilly, played the south coast "Parallel Realities" pub and college circuit until they released their first collection, "Parallel Universe: Epiphanies at Tiffanys" (unusually a live double, recorded at Tiffany's Bar in Southampton). BB Wolf relished the characterisation of their gigs in the music press as being a timewarp back to 1969 (and were flattered when a group of local journalists themselves formed the ironic counter-band "Warp '69").

Early influences:
Although homage to 1969 was never their intention, it is true that BB Wolf's primary influences seem to have been Hendrix and Black Sabbath. A contemporary interview reveals that the band's list of all-time most influential albums is dominated by early rock:

and indeed (Martin, in the same interview for Glen Eyre Radio):
"I refute vigourously that we are stuck in 1969. We are stuck in 1970. And I claim that this is not the dreadful fate some might imagine!

"What is the high point of western civilisation so far? What is the pinnacle towards which we might claim we were all working, if we felt the need to ascribe a singular, justificatory point to it all? Perhaps you say 'there is no such point - it's more complicated that that'. But if there _were_ such a point, you wouldn't want to have missed it, would you!? For me it is simple. I would nominate The Isle of Wight version of Red House.

"The tools Hendrix uses there nominally to deconstruct the blues, he leaves lying in your mind at the end. This set of tools is adequate to deconstruct every mode of western art upon which the contemporary musical theory was built - that is, essentially, all western art. If you apply it, pretty much anywhere, the energy which haemorrhages from the pieces is plenty for our band's artistic purposes. I note that Hendrix, undoubtedly the most influential of modern musicians, died shortly after creating this masterpiece. I claim that no guitarist born since Hendrix died has demonstrated 'the spark'." There is nothing wrong, therefore, with 1970!!

Influences:

Partial Discography:

Links